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VPN routing PC offers four PoE ports

Dec 22, 2009 — by Eric Brown — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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Korenix announced a VPN routing computer that comes with a Linux development platform. The JetBox 9533G is based on a 667MHz Intel IXP435 RISC processor, offers four PoE and four gigabit Ethernet ports plus a WAN connection, and has three USB ports.

Designed to provide high-bandwidth network connections in industrial environments, the fanless JetBox 9533G is described as a front-end control system that also operates as a networking gateway. The latest in a number of Linux-ready, ruggedized JetBox devices — the JetBox 9300 (pictured at right) was announced in Nov. 2007 — the JetBox offers Layer 3 routing and VPN functions "for dynamic long-distance and secure network groups," says Korenix.

The JetBox 9533G is built around an Intel IXP435 Networking Processor. This 667MHz RISC processor is based on an XScale core, and includes a pair of Intel's NPEs (network processing engines). On the JetBox, it is combined with 128MB DDR2 RAM and 32MB flash, with flash expansion available via SD and CF slots.


JetBox 9533G

(Click to enlarge)

The device's four PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) ports provide up to 15.4W power per port and 60 Watts per unit to IP cameras and other remote network devices, while also delivering control data, says Korenix. The JetBox 9533G also provides four separate gigabit Ethernet ports, as well as a 10/100Mbps WAN port. This configuration enables the JetBox to control and power four devices, while also acting as a backbone networking device that can connect to up to four gigabit switches, says the company.

Additional I/O includes three USB 2.0 Host ports, 8 DIO connections, and an RS232 console port, says Korenix. RFID, WLAN, and WiMAX modules are said to be optional.

The fanless, ruggedized, IP31-compliant chassis offers anti-vibration and anti-shock support, and can withstand temperatures ranging from -13 to 158 deg. F (-25 to 70deg. C), says Korenix.

The JetBox is said to ship with an embedded Linux Modulized Webmin UI, capable of running customized control programs. The system also ships with cross-platform applications by JavaVM, and supports the Korenix Auto-Run customization setting on SD cards, allowing customers to develop customized industrial control applications, says the company.


JetBox 9533G schematics

Specifications listed for the JetBox 9533G include:

  • Processor — Intel IXP435 667MHz Networking Processor
  • Memory — 128MB DDR2 RAM
  • Flash — 32MB
  • Flash expansion — 1 x SD card slot; 1 x CF card slot
  • Gigabit Ethernet — 4 x 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet
  • Fast Ethernet — 5 x 10/100Mbps Ethernet (1 x WAN; 4 x PoE for 15.4W per port and 60W per unit)
  • Wireless — Optional modules for RFID, WLAN, and WiMAX
  • Other I/O:
    • USB — 3 x USB 2.0 Host
    • Digital I/O — 8 x DIO (default 8 x DI, but customers can define DI vs. DO)
    • Console port (RS232 interface)
  • Networking features — Complete Layer 3 routing support (OSPF, RIP, DVMRP, IPv6); QoS; VLAN; PoE scheduling
  • Other features — Fanless design; LEDs; power/reset buttons; watchdog timer
  • Power — DC input 48V (for PoE); DC input 12 ~ 48V
  • Ruggedization:
    • Rugged aluminum alloy chassis with IP31 protection
    • IEC60068-2-27 anti-shock (50g peak acceleration)
    • IEC60068-2-6 anti-vibration (5g/ 10~150Hz/operating)
    • At least 200,000 hours MTBF @ 25oC
  • Operating temperature — -13 to 158 deg. F (-25 to 70 deg. C)
  • Dimensions — 6.3 x 4.4 x 3.0 inches (160 x 112 x 76mm); wall-mount (DIN-rail optional)
  • Weight — 2.36 lbs (1.07 k)
  • Operating system — Embedded Linux 2.6.20

Availability

Korenix did not provide pricing or availability information on the JetBox 9533G Embedded Gigabit L3 Router Computer. More information, including a datasheet with more details on the Linux stack, may be found here.


This article was originally published on LinuxDevices and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.

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