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SBE announces Embedded Linux support for ‘carrier class’ platform

Aug 29, 2002 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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San Ramon, CA — (press release excerpt) — SBE Inc. today announced the immediate availability of its HighWire 400p/M DKL, a hardware/software developers kit for embedded Linux applications. The HW400p/M DKL combines SBE's HW400p/M PCI core processor with a complete TimeSys embedded Linux software developers kit including the enhanced TimeSys GPL Linux kernel and a complete cross development tool chain. To further the flexibility of this hardware/software solution, the HW400p/M can be coupled with SBE's wanPMC line of PMC modules, to provide high-density T1/E1/J1, DS3 (T3), or HSSI communications interfaces.

The HW400p/M DKL incorporates the open source TimeSys Linux GPL kernel, offering a new level of development flexibility for PCI applications. The modular I/O site of the HW400p/M allows rapid integration of a wide range of communications and other interfaces. The enhanced scheduling feature of the TimeSys kernel yields real time responsiveness in a familiar open source Linux environment. The optional TimeSys real time CPU and network bandwidth reservation modules allow the addition of advanced, patent pending real time features, not available in other Linux implementations.

The HW400p/M brings the flexibility of a carrier-class core-processing platform to the PCI Bus form factor. By combining a standardized PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC) site with a full-featured PowerPC processor core, the HW400p/M can be used to address a wide range of I/O and protocol processing requirements. In addition to the wanPMC product line, the HW400p/M also accepts most third-party PMC modules, allowing integrators to address a wide range of requirements with a single common core architecture.

 
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