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Rugged ETX computer-on-module supports Linux

Jun 8, 2004 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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Ampro Computers is shipping a computer-on-module it calls “the world's first rugged ETX module.” The ETX 700 is available with a choice of low-power Intel processors, supports Linux, and targets harsh environment medical, military, transportation, and industrial applications.

(Click here for larger image)

The ETX 700 operates across an extended -40° to +85°C temperature range, and provides high resistance to vibration and shock, and humid and corrosive conditions, according to Ampro. It is available with a conformal coating. The module uses a board 50 percent thicker than normal, to resist flexing during installation on a baseboard. It also uses extra copper, to smoothly dissipate heat.

Features and specifications of the ETX 700 include:

  • Processor options:
    • 933 MHz low voltage Pentium III
    • 650 MHz low voltage Celeron

    • 400 MHz ultra low voltage Celeron

  • Memory — Up to 512MB SDRAM, up to 512KB level 2 cache
  • Dual PCI-bus enhanced ultra DMA 33/66/100 synchronous IDE interface supports up to four hard drives
  • AGP 4X video interface with built-in LVDS, up to 32MB UMA frame buffer, supports 1600×1200 resolution
  • Dual 10/100BaseT Ethernet
  • Other input/output ports:

    • Dual serial
    • ECP/EPP parallel
    • Floppy drive interface
    • Four USB 1.1
    • IrDA
    • PS/2 keyboard/mouse
    • AC97 sound

  • Dimensions — 95 x 114 mm ETX form-factor

“Ampro is responding to an outcry for a rugged, reliable ETX module,” explained Ampro CEO Joanne Mumola Williams.

The ETX 700 is priced at under $350 in moderate volumes. The company says it is available now for evaluation and qualification, with production volumes following in 30 days.


 
This article was originally published on LinuxDevices and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.

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