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Open source 802.11n router gains NTFS file-sharing

Dec 21, 2009 — by Eric Brown — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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Paragon Software Group (PSG) announced Paragon NTFS for Linux support for NetGear's new open source 802.11n router. With Paragon NTFS support for NetGear's RangeMax Wireless-N Gigabit Router with USB (WNR3500L), users can share read/write access to attached NTFS-formatted Windows hard disk drives (HDD), says Paragon.

The Linux version of Paragon NTFS is now embedded in the WNR3500L router's Universal File System Driver (UFSD), says Netgear. The embedded version is said to include a "full version (not a trial version)" of the UFSD, which is likely based on Paragon NTFS for Linux 7.0 Embedded Solution, This version appears to be similar to the free "Express" version of Paragon NTFS (see image farther below). Paragon also sells a $100 Professional version, which includes additional RAID drivers and Linux utilities.

The Paragon NTFS for Linux version of UFSD enables full high performance read/write access to a Windows-based, NTFS (New Technology File System) formatted external hard drive attached to the USB port of the WNR3500L router, says Paragon. This is said to enable all PCs, clients, and servers on the network, running Linux, Windows,  or Macintosh OS X, to access an attached NTFS-formatted HDD. In addition, says Paragon, it has joined NetGear's Development Partner Program.

File copying using Paragon NTFS for Linux 7.0 Express
(Click to enlarge)

Paragon's NTFS for Linux is said to offer features and benefits, including:

  • Full read/write access: Read, modify, delete, and create or copy files
  • "User-friendly" installation wizard
  • NTFS partitions can be mounted like native partitions, without requiring special commands.
  • File and folder names available in languages including Chinese, Korean, Japanese, and Russian
  • Data transfers do not degrade system performance, claims Paragon.
  • Based on Paragon's own UFSD, supporting file-systems like NTFS, HFS+, Ext2/3, and FAT

Announced in early October, the WNR3500L (pictured at right) now appears to be shipping. Designed as a mini-tower, measuring 6.9 x 5.1 x 1.4 inches (175 x 130 x 35mm) the device is equipped with twice the RAM and four times the flash memory as the earlier, similarly hackable NetGear WGR614L 802.11g router, offering 64MB of RAM and 8MB of flash.

The 802.11n access point supports bandwidth of up to 300Mbps, and can be enhanced with a wireless repeater mode to extend range, says NetGear. Four 10/100/1000Mbps LAN ports and one 10/100/1000Mbps WAN port are said to be provided. There is also a USB 2.0 Host port that can be used for networked storage, with DLNA/UPnP media server support, as well as for USB-based remote access and 3G/4G/WiMAX cellular connections.

NetGear supports the WNR3500L, as well as the WGR614L, with its MyOpenRouter router community. The site offers open source firmware downloads, applications, forums, blogs, articles, source code, user guides, and technical support, says NetGear.

Stated NetGar's Som Pal Choudhury, senior product line manager, Advanced Wireless division, "Paragon has enthusiastically responded to NetGear's open source router initiative to provide enhanced capabilities to our user community."

Stated Tom Fedro, president for Paragon Software Group, "Paragon's NTFS for Linux provides full performance, high speed file sharing to NTFS-formatted USB hard drives, an important feature for NetGear customers that we are happy to provide."

Availability

The NetGear WNR3500L router with Paragon NTFS for Linux appears to be available now. More information on NTFS for Linux 7.0 Embedded Solution may be found here. More information on NetGear's MyOpenRouter community should be here.


This article was originally published on LinuxDevices and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.

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