LinuxDevices.com Archive Index (1999-2012) | 2013-current at LinuxGizmos.com | About  
Follow LinuxGizmos:
Twitter Google+ Facebook RSS feed
*   get email updates   *

Multifunction Linux mobile phone packs PDA punch

Feb 24, 2005 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
Please share:    Tweet about this on TwitterGoogle+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on RedditPin on PinterestEmail to someone

A German company named ROAD (Remote Office Access Devices) has introduced an unusual multifunction Linux mobile phone. Flipping the model S101 “Handy-PC” open reveals a keyboard and screen for interacting with computer applications. Flip it closed again, and it's a GSM phone.


ROAD's “Handy-PC” multifunction phone/PDA in phone mode and PDA mode
(Click each image to enlarge)

The device is based on a 400 MHz Intel XScale PXA263 processor running a Linux 2.6 kernel along with Trolltech's Qtopia graphical user interface and PIM suite. It comes with 64 MB of RAM and 64 MB of flash memory, measures 128 x 60 x 25 mm, and weighs in at 210 grams.

The Handy-PC's telephone display is a 102 x 65-pixel, monochrome LCD, and its telephone keypad provides 20 keys in a conventional layout. Flipping it open reveals a color 640 x 240-pixel (half-VGA) LCD with touchscreen and a 63-key QWERTY keyboard for interacting with PIM apps and viewers for Word, Excel, Outlook, and PDF files.

On the I/O front, the device includes a USB 2.0 interface, quadband GSM (850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz) with EDGE, and a choice of WLAN, Bluetooth, and IRDA wireless modules. A built-in 2-megapixel camera is also available as an option. The multifunction device also provides an appointment calendar, pocket calculator, dictating machine, MP3 player, Internet browser, and email client. A cryptology program is optionally available.

The device has a rechargeable 1500 mAh lithium-polymer battery. When operating as a phone, it has 4 hours of battery life, 240 hours on standby. When operating as a PC (with GSM phone switched off), battery life is 5 hours, with standby of 30 days.

Motorola introduced a somewhat similar dual-mode device one year ago, the MPx, based on Microsoft's Windows Mobile smartphone software platform.


 
This article was originally published on LinuxDevices and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.

(advertise here)


Comments are closed.