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Motorola unveils its ‘fastest ever CPCI board’, including HA Linux

Aug 29, 2002 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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Tempe, AZ — (press release excerpt) — Motorola Computer Group today launched the 5385 CompactPCI controller blade, designed to deliver the extreme levels of performance and bandwidth demanded by many of today's telecom, industrial control and medical imaging applications. Featuring a 1.2 GHz Mobile Intel Pentium III-M processor, the 5385 is Motorola's fastest ever CompactPCI board.

The 5385 uses the Micron Copperhead chipset to support up to 2GB of 266 MHz double data rate (DDR) SDRAM, a high-speed memory standard. It is also one of the first CompactPCI boards in the industry to feature a PCI-X internal bus for high-speed on-board communication. Motorola has designed the 5385 to exploit this architecture by including dual gigabit Ethernet interfaces to support PICMG 2.16 CPSB switched fabric backplane architectures.

Compliance with the PICMG 2.1 Hot Swap specification and support for Motorola's Advanced High Availability Software for Linux makes the 5385 an ideal open architecture building block for mission-critical applications requiring 5NINES (99.999%) or higher service availability. It also supports PICMG 2.9 IPMI intelligent platform management interface, which defines a standard for chassis management and industry standard operating systems such as Linux, Windows 2000 and VxWorks. An industry standard 32/64-bit mezzanine expansion site enables equipment manufacturers to add a PMC module to customize the 5385 and create an application-specific network blade.

Samples of the 5385 are available now to early adopter customers and Motorola anticipates full production in Q4 2002 at a list price of $2995.



 
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