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Linux-based PMP features head-worn display

Jan 7, 2008 — by Eric Brown — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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A new Linux-based portable media player (PMP) is equipped with a 0.44-inch, head-mounted OLED microdisplay visor with 800 x 600 resolution. Dreamax's Indicube i-800 PMP offers an experience equivalent to sitting seven feet from a 54-inch screen, the vendor claims.


An Indicube user watching Harry Potter

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The Indicube combines a Linux-based PMP with an HMD (head-mounted display). On its website, the Korean company states, “Because it equipped with a Linux embedded system, Indicube not only offers a file managing system like a PC, but can decode most codecs sufficient to play HD videos easily.”


eMagin's OLED microdisplay, side and top
(Click either to enlarge)

The key attraction of the Indicube is an OLED (organic light emitting diode) microdisplay made by eMagin. The display offers the “world's smallest pixel pitch for a mobile virtual imaging product,” according to eMagin. Other touted display features include analog and digital signal processing, and a high-density OLED-on-silicon display technology said to reduce requirements for extra circuitry. This enables reduced size, power consumption, and a weight of only three ounces.


CeBIT attendees trying out eMagin's head-mounted display
(Click to enlarge)

The 3DS OLED-XL's 800 x 600-pixel array is designed with triads of vertical sub-pixels that comprise each 11.1 x 11.1-micrometer color pixel. Other touted features include pixel uniformity, improved color gamut, and an on-chip temperature sensor and compensation. Timing controls are said to accommodate a variety of video formats. The 3DS OLED-XL also boasts ergonomic enhancements such as a magnetic earphone station, frame adjustment with considerable range, and an adjustable nose clip.

Inside the Indicube

The Indicube is equipped with 12GB of storage plus an 8GB Flash card, with options to expand to up to 32GB of Flash. The company did not offer details on the processor, memory, or other internal details. The 2.3 x 4.8 x 0.9-inch PMP is said to offer full MP3 stereo sound via the 3DS OLED-XL's integrated earphones. It includes a USB interface as well as an NTSC/PAL auto-detect AV input, which together are said to enable video input from TVs, DVD players, iPOD Videos, PCs, PMPs, smartphones, and game player boxes such as the PS2 and Xbox.


Dreamax Indicube PMP with display

The Indicube's Linux-based GUI includes an icon-based file manager, games, and a photo-display application that offers the ability to play music files as MP3 player with sliding background pictures, says Dreamax. Firmware upgrades are said to be available via download.

Here are Dreamax's stated specifications for the Indicube:

  • Storage - 16GB mini hard disk
  • Flash — 8GB SD Flash (can recognize up to 32GB)
  • Display — Active Matrix OLED 800 x 600 SVGA
  • Optical view angle — 38 degrees diagonal
  • Image size — 0.44 inches (equivalent of 54-inch screen from two meters away)
  • Eye relief — 22 mm
  • Aspect Ratio — 4 : 3
  • Eyewear weight — 0.18 lbs (85 grams, or 2.9 ounces)
  • Codecs — WMV, MPEG2, DivX, Xvid (video); WMA, MP3, AC3, AAC, OGG (audio)
  • USB - 1 x USB 2.0 client and host
  • NTSC/PAL interface - auto-detect AV input
  • Battery — 3500mAh rechargeable Li-Polymer with detachable pack
  • DC power input — 5V 2A DC
  • Dimensions - 2.3 x 4.8 x 0.9 inches (59 x 122 x 22 mm)

Availability

eMagin says its SVGA 3DS OLED-XL Microdisplay will ship in March. The Indicube is expected to ship in May. Both products are being demonstrated at this week's CES show. More details may be available on Dreamax's Indicube website, here.

EMagin is best known for its Z800 3DVisor, which provides 3D stereovision and head-tracking for PC gaming, training and simulation, immersion therapy, and other applications.


 
This article was originally published on LinuxDevices and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.

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