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Gumstix adds connectors and Bluetooth

Aug 25, 2004 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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Gumstix has revised its line of gumstick-sized SBCs (single board computers), adding a 60-pin Hirose connector and optional Bluetooth connectivity. The Gumstix PXA255-powered SBCs measure just 3-1/8 x 13/16 x 5/16 inches (80 x 20 x 7mm), and are supplied with Linux and the u-boot bootloader.

The new f-series Gumstix boards, the 200-f and 400-f, include a Hirose DF12C(3.0)60DS0.5V80 connector. Previous Gumstix boards included only a bare pad connector.


The f-series Gumstix boards feature a 60-pin Hirose connector

The 200f-bt and 400f-bt, meanwhile, add an Infineon Bluetooth Module integrated onto the board.

The 200-series Gumstix boards are priced at $109, or $154 with Bluetooth. They include an Intel XScale PCA255 clocked at 200MHz, 64MB SDRAM, 4 MB flash, and an MMC slot. They come with Linux 2.6.7, and the u-boot bootloader. They draw <200 mA, and on-board power management circuitry accepts 3.4V - 5.2V Li-Ion, Li-Polymer or 3-NiMH batteries, or standard 4.5V or 5.0V inputs. Additional I/O includes UART (3), I2C, USB Client, NSSP, PWM (2), AC97, LCD Controller, and JTAG. The 400-series Gumstix boards are priced at $139, or $184 with Bluetooth. They include an Intel XScale PCA255 clocked at 400MHz, 64MB SDRAM, 4 MB Strataflash, and an MMC slot. They come with Linux 2.6.7 and the u-boot bootloader. They draw <250 mA, and on-board power management circuitry accepts 3.4V - 5.2V Li-Ion, Li-Polymer or 3-NiMH batteries, or a standard 4.5V or 5.0V input. Additional I/O includes UART (3), I2C, USB Client, NSSP, PWM (2), AC97, LCD Controller, and JTAG. Gumstix also offers “Waysmall” cases (pictured at right) for the boards. The cases support two RS232 serial ports, a USB 1.1 client, and an MMC card. The USB client is configured as an Ethernet gadget, and uses RNDIS, meaning it can be plugged into the USB plug on most Windows machines or Linux hosts, according to Gumstix, for Internet connectivity.


 
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