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Emulator/analyzer provides Linux-aware debug

Feb 25, 2005 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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American Arium will demonstrate what it claims is the world's first in-circuit emulator/trace port analyzer with 1GB trace depth and a half-clock capture rate of 640 MHz at the Intel Developer Forum next week. The GT-1000D is “Linux-aware,” providing full source-level kernel debug and application debug in a GUI environment, along with flexible data termination, clock termination, and clock timing for what the company calls “unmatched” signal integrity and data recovery.

(Click here for larger view of the GT-1000D)

The GT-1000D, equipped with TCP/IP and USB 1.1 host interfaces, provides full instruction set support for ARM7, ARM9, ARM11, Intel XScale, and Texas Instruments OMAP processor cores, supporting ARM ETM (Embedded Trace Macrocell) and Intel XScale Real Time Trace. It features software-adjustable Thevenin-equivalent data termination of 44 to 100 Ohms for “exceptional” data signal integrity; software-adjustable clock termination of 0, 60, 90, 135, or 180 Ohms to 0 to 100 percent of target VCC for “outstanding” clock signal integrity; and five software-adjustable clock timing settings from 0 to 1.33 ns and a 44-bit time stamp with 10 ns resolution. It comes equipped with a 38-pin ETM Mictor connector for trace and a 20-pin JTAG connector for straight run control at from 1 KHz to 40 MHz.


The GT-1000D includes Arium's SourcePoint debugging software
(Click image for a larger view)

Bundled with a personality probe and the company�s SourcePoint debugger, the GT-1000D is priced at $16,000. It will be available at the end of March.


 
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