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Embedding Linux in a surface-to-surface PC

Feb 28, 2003 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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How do you fit square pegs into round holes? Get smaller pegs!

When I first thought of this case mod, there were only two responses, cool! Or why? The answer to why is simple: cause I can!

This started as an actual U.S. Air Force surplus Mk 81, Low Drag General Purpose (LDGP) bomb, tail assembly. Because of the unique nature of this case, almost all pieces had to be customized. Most were built from scratch. This case took about a month to complete.

The tail section came with two large dents to prevent reuse in its former capacity. One was able to be pressed almost all the way out by a hydraulic press and a torch, that wasn't enough, the press broke and so the major dent was only turned into minor surface rippling.

The upper portion and nose cone were hand crafted from an old CPU case and a stainless steel mixing bowl. All internal support brackets had to be custom created for this project. There are two custom molded acrylic viewing ports, one for cooling and one for video plug in. Everything in here was an extremely tight fit with just enough tolerance between parts to allow for assembly.

Manual I/O is handled by a CUSA wireless keyboard and mouse. The motherboard is a VIA epia mini-itx form-factor board with a C3 800 MHz processor.

This, of course, is not my main PC. That would be impractical — this was just for fun!

Specs . . .

  • Code name: KiSA 444, surface to surface PC
  • Speed: 800 MHz with 512MB PC133 SDRAM
  • Range: 3.2GB Western Digital, plus 1 HP CDR/RW
  • Payload: Linux Red Hat 8
  • Length: 42 in.
  • Diameter: 7.75 in.
  • Cooling:
    • 2 x 80mm antec led fans,
    • 1 x 120mm mobo cooling fan,
    • 1 psu fan and 1 CPU fan

 
This article was originally published on LinuxDevices and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.

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