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Applied Data Systems spins XScale-based version of Bitsy

Aug 29, 2002 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive
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Columbia, MD — (press release excerpt) — Applied Data Systems (ADS) has announced the Bitsy X, a compact (3 x 5 in.) full-featured single board computer (SBC) based a 400 MHz Intel PXA250 system-on-chip XScale processor with an SA-1111 companion chip. The Bitsy-X is designed for PDA/handheld, instrumentation, medical monitoring, and other battery-powered embedded applications. The tiny SBC is delivered with all required low-level drivers and stacks for immediate operation under an Embedded Linux operating system, and offers scalability via 'personality' connector boards.

The Bitsy-X includes onboard interfaces for LCD, touchscreen, USB (master and slave), 3 serial ports (configurable as RS-232, TTL and IRDA), RS232/485, SPI, I2C, audio input, and amplified stereo output (2.2 W). The Bitsy also includes 12 digital IO's, four analog inputs and nine additional digital IO's that can be configured as a 4 x 5 keypad. The graphics subsystem includes backlight control, Vee generation, and interfaces to flat panels up to 1024 x 768 pixels. The ADSmartIO controller provides a variety of configurable I/O options which allow tailoring the system to an application's specific requirements. Dynamic power management provides efficient battery utilization, and operation is supported over the -40 to +85 deg C industrial temperature range. The Bitsy X provides maximum flexibility through a range of “personality” connector boards which currently include Ethernet, CompactFlash, IDE, digital I/O, etc. Schematics are provided for several personality boards, making it easy to design custom personality boards.

The Bitsy X development systems are in the $3800 range, with production units in the $400 range.



 
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